Colombians who backed the peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC, show their disappointment after the deal was narrowly rejected in a referendum on October 2, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC rebels agreed to end the five-decade-long armed conflict that killed more than 220,000 people ended the following month. 

Colombians who backed the peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC, show their disappointment after the deal was narrowly rejected in a referendum on October 2, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC rebels agreed to end the five-decade-long armed conflict that killed more than 220,000 people ended the following month. 

 Fernanda Forero and Andres Labrador hug in Plaza Bolivar during a political rally to end the Colombian conflict in Bogotá, Colombia. Overheard all around them, "que la guerra descansa en paz!" The war should rest in peace.

Fernanda Forero and Andres Labrador hug in Plaza Bolivar during a political rally to end the Colombian conflict in Bogotá, Colombia. Overheard all around them, "que la guerra descansa en paz!" The war should rest in peace.

 A doctor performs an abortion at a women’s reproductive health clinic on January 18, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Colombia has relatively liberal abortion laws compared to some of its South American neighbors - women can legally gets abortions when their health is in danger, the fetus is severely deformed or in cases of rape - but political opposition and bureaucratic hurdles make access difficult and drive women to dangerous illegal procedures. 

A doctor performs an abortion at a women’s reproductive health clinic on January 18, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Colombia has relatively liberal abortion laws compared to some of its South American neighbors - women can legally gets abortions when their health is in danger, the fetus is severely deformed or in cases of rape - but political opposition and bureaucratic hurdles make access difficult and drive women to dangerous illegal procedures. 

 A pot of rice boils in La Guajira, Colombia. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered Colombia to take action against poverty in the region where more than 4,000 indigenous children have died of malnutrition in the past eight years.

A pot of rice boils in La Guajira, Colombia. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered Colombia to take action against poverty in the region where more than 4,000 indigenous children have died of malnutrition in the past eight years.

 Demonstrators are blocked by Police at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) while protesting U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. 

Demonstrators are blocked by Police at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) while protesting U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. 

 Babies nap at Fundación Juan Felipe Gómez Escobar, a non-profit organization that provides impovershed mothers healthcare, psychological therapy and job training in Cartagena, Colombia. 

Babies nap at Fundación Juan Felipe Gómez Escobar, a non-profit organization that provides impovershed mothers healthcare, psychological therapy and job training in Cartagena, Colombia. 

 Water is collected at a well in La Guajira, Colombia. In 2016 the region suffered the worst drought in history. 

Water is collected at a well in La Guajira, Colombia. In 2016 the region suffered the worst drought in history. 

 Sofia Sanchez, 9, stands for a portrait during a vigil for her classmate and friend, Yuliana Samboni, 7, outside the home where she lived with her family in the Bosque Calderón neighborhood on December 6, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Yuliana was taken from her home earlier this week by Rafael Uribe Noguera who raped, tortured and killed her. Her sign reads, "stop violence towards girls." 

Sofia Sanchez, 9, stands for a portrait during a vigil for her classmate and friend, Yuliana Samboni, 7, outside the home where she lived with her family in the Bosque Calderón neighborhood on December 6, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Yuliana was taken from her home earlier this week by Rafael Uribe Noguera who raped, tortured and killed her. Her sign reads, "stop violence towards girls." 

 Noel Castañeda poses for a portrait at Rafeal Trejo Boxing gym in Havana, Cuba. In 2005 Noel won the boxing world championships in London. Boxers at the gym are a mix women and men, many of which are like Noel who have moved to the city to learn from and with the best. 

Noel Castañeda poses for a portrait at Rafeal Trejo Boxing gym in Havana, Cuba. In 2005 Noel won the boxing world championships in London. Boxers at the gym are a mix women and men, many of which are like Noel who have moved to the city to learn from and with the best. 

 Jose Rosado is one of 40 boaters taking people out to see wild flamingos at Camarones' sanctuary where he lives in La Guajira, Colombia. The boaters work in shifts because visitors don't come often.  He said there's been a recent push to make his home a national park. If it happens it would remove him and everyone else who lives in the sanctuary.

Jose Rosado is one of 40 boaters taking people out to see wild flamingos at Camarones' sanctuary where he lives in La Guajira, Colombia. The boaters work in shifts because visitors don't come often. He said there's been a recent push to make his home a national park. If it happens it would remove him and everyone else who lives in the sanctuary.

 Baru  Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto in the Amazon jungle of Colombia. He was born and raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots and wants to find ways to conserve the natural world, disseminate messages about respect. 

Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto in the Amazon jungle of Colombia. He was born and raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots and wants to find ways to conserve the natural world, disseminate messages about respect. 

 Maria Del Mar Toledo, 25, shows her scar from being shot while fighting for the FARC while in the one-bedroom apartment in Bogotá, Colombia on September 21, 2016. Toledo was 11 when she joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC and demobilized after being shot at 17. She wishes the Colombian Peace Deal would include people like her. Toledo lives in Ciudad Bolivar, one of the most dangerous areas of Colombia's capital city of Bogotá. 

Maria Del Mar Toledo, 25, shows her scar from being shot while fighting for the FARC while in the one-bedroom apartment in Bogotá, Colombia on September 21, 2016. Toledo was 11 when she joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC and demobilized after being shot at 17. She wishes the Colombian Peace Deal would include people like her. Toledo lives in Ciudad Bolivar, one of the most dangerous areas of Colombia's capital city of Bogotá. 

 A goat is tied up in La Guajira, Colombia before it is skinned and cooked for a Wayuu burial ceremony. Wayuu people are the largest indigenous group in Colombia. 

A goat is tied up in La Guajira, Colombia before it is skinned and cooked for a Wayuu burial ceremony. Wayuu people are the largest indigenous group in Colombia. 

 Edwards Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. They live in neighboring towns along the Amazon River and see one another when Edwards can take a boat to visit.    

Edwards Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. They live in neighboring towns along the Amazon River and see one another when Edwards can take a boat to visit. 

 

 Yesenia Moreno Rodríguez, 25, poses for a portrait in Plaza Bolivar on November 11, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. She is part of Movimiento Estudiantil Paziempre, a student group dedicated to fighting for peace. After the Colombian peace deal was rejected, the group helped organize a silent march where 50,000 people ended up in Plaza Bolivar. 

Yesenia Moreno Rodríguez, 25, poses for a portrait in Plaza Bolivar on November 11, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. She is part of Movimiento Estudiantil Paziempre, a student group dedicated to fighting for peace. After the Colombian peace deal was rejected, the group helped organize a silent march where 50,000 people ended up in Plaza Bolivar. 

 Elivia Careca leads a song and dance activity to her pre-school class in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. Elvia says it's important to teach children about to value the place where they are from.    

Elivia Careca leads a song and dance activity to her pre-school class in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. Elvia says it's important to teach children about to value the place where they are from. 

 

 Thousands of people take part in a march for peace in downtown Bogotá on October 5, 2016, in Colombia. After Colombia's peace deal to end the armed conflict was rejected in a referendum, university students organized the event to demand that the government continues their efforts to achieve peace. 

Thousands of people take part in a march for peace in downtown Bogotá on October 5, 2016, in Colombia. After Colombia's peace deal to end the armed conflict was rejected in a referendum, university students organized the event to demand that the government continues their efforts to achieve peace. 

 Children play at Plaza Bolivar in Bogotá, Colombia. 

Children play at Plaza Bolivar in Bogotá, Colombia. 

  Nuria Serron, 84, was one of a town full of people who were dislocated in the Colombian Amazon due to the rising river. All but five community members moved from Pozo Redondo up the river to the unestablished town of Puerto Esperanza, which translates to Port of Hope. Nuria works as a medicine healer with her husband. They use homemade substances to heal their community. Nuria said many come to them before heading to the hospital.

Nuria Serron, 84, was one of a town full of people who were dislocated in the Colombian Amazon due to the rising river. All but five community members moved from Pozo Redondo up the river to the unestablished town of Puerto Esperanza, which translates to Port of Hope. Nuria works as a medicine healer with her husband. They use homemade substances to heal their community. Nuria said many come to them before heading to the hospital.

 Each  year the Amazon River eroded more land where Ediver grew up. Eventually life for his family became unsustainable. At a young age he was dislocated and now lives in Puerto Esperanza, an hour from the where he was born.

Each year the Amazon River eroded more land where Ediver grew up. Eventually life for his family became unsustainable. At a young age he was dislocated and now lives in Puerto Esperanza, an hour from the where he was born.

20170128_DPM_LAXProtest_953.JPG
 A group of Wayuu people, indigenous to La Guajira in northern Colombia, leave a burial ceremony. Twenty-four-year-old Maricela Ipiayu was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 and later died of extreme malnutrution. 

A group of Wayuu people, indigenous to La Guajira in northern Colombia, leave a burial ceremony. Twenty-four-year-old Maricela Ipiayu was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 and later died of extreme malnutrution. 

 Colombians who backed the peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC, show their disappointment after the deal was narrowly rejected in a referendum on October 2, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC rebels agreed to end the five-decade-long armed conflict that killed more than 220,000 people ended the following month. 
 Fernanda Forero and Andres Labrador hug in Plaza Bolivar during a political rally to end the Colombian conflict in Bogotá, Colombia. Overheard all around them, "que la guerra descansa en paz!" The war should rest in peace.
 A doctor performs an abortion at a women’s reproductive health clinic on January 18, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Colombia has relatively liberal abortion laws compared to some of its South American neighbors - women can legally gets abortions when their health is in danger, the fetus is severely deformed or in cases of rape - but political opposition and bureaucratic hurdles make access difficult and drive women to dangerous illegal procedures. 
 A pot of rice boils in La Guajira, Colombia. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered Colombia to take action against poverty in the region where more than 4,000 indigenous children have died of malnutrition in the past eight years.
 Demonstrators are blocked by Police at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) while protesting U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. 
 Babies nap at Fundación Juan Felipe Gómez Escobar, a non-profit organization that provides impovershed mothers healthcare, psychological therapy and job training in Cartagena, Colombia. 
 Water is collected at a well in La Guajira, Colombia. In 2016 the region suffered the worst drought in history. 
 Sofia Sanchez, 9, stands for a portrait during a vigil for her classmate and friend, Yuliana Samboni, 7, outside the home where she lived with her family in the Bosque Calderón neighborhood on December 6, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Yuliana was taken from her home earlier this week by Rafael Uribe Noguera who raped, tortured and killed her. Her sign reads, "stop violence towards girls." 
 Noel Castañeda poses for a portrait at Rafeal Trejo Boxing gym in Havana, Cuba. In 2005 Noel won the boxing world championships in London. Boxers at the gym are a mix women and men, many of which are like Noel who have moved to the city to learn from and with the best. 
 Jose Rosado is one of 40 boaters taking people out to see wild flamingos at Camarones' sanctuary where he lives in La Guajira, Colombia. The boaters work in shifts because visitors don't come often.  He said there's been a recent push to make his home a national park. If it happens it would remove him and everyone else who lives in the sanctuary.
 Baru  Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto in the Amazon jungle of Colombia. He was born and raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots and wants to find ways to conserve the natural world, disseminate messages about respect. 
 Maria Del Mar Toledo, 25, shows her scar from being shot while fighting for the FARC while in the one-bedroom apartment in Bogotá, Colombia on September 21, 2016. Toledo was 11 when she joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC and demobilized after being shot at 17. She wishes the Colombian Peace Deal would include people like her. Toledo lives in Ciudad Bolivar, one of the most dangerous areas of Colombia's capital city of Bogotá. 
 A goat is tied up in La Guajira, Colombia before it is skinned and cooked for a Wayuu burial ceremony. Wayuu people are the largest indigenous group in Colombia. 
 Edwards Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. They live in neighboring towns along the Amazon River and see one another when Edwards can take a boat to visit.    
 Yesenia Moreno Rodríguez, 25, poses for a portrait in Plaza Bolivar on November 11, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. She is part of Movimiento Estudiantil Paziempre, a student group dedicated to fighting for peace. After the Colombian peace deal was rejected, the group helped organize a silent march where 50,000 people ended up in Plaza Bolivar. 
 Elivia Careca leads a song and dance activity to her pre-school class in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. Elvia says it's important to teach children about to value the place where they are from.    
 Thousands of people take part in a march for peace in downtown Bogotá on October 5, 2016, in Colombia. After Colombia's peace deal to end the armed conflict was rejected in a referendum, university students organized the event to demand that the government continues their efforts to achieve peace. 
 Children play at Plaza Bolivar in Bogotá, Colombia. 
  Nuria Serron, 84, was one of a town full of people who were dislocated in the Colombian Amazon due to the rising river. All but five community members moved from Pozo Redondo up the river to the unestablished town of Puerto Esperanza, which translates to Port of Hope. Nuria works as a medicine healer with her husband. They use homemade substances to heal their community. Nuria said many come to them before heading to the hospital.
 Each  year the Amazon River eroded more land where Ediver grew up. Eventually life for his family became unsustainable. At a young age he was dislocated and now lives in Puerto Esperanza, an hour from the where he was born.
20170128_DPM_LAXProtest_953.JPG
 A group of Wayuu people, indigenous to La Guajira in northern Colombia, leave a burial ceremony. Twenty-four-year-old Maricela Ipiayu was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 and later died of extreme malnutrution. 

Colombians who backed the peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC, show their disappointment after the deal was narrowly rejected in a referendum on October 2, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. President Juan Manuel Santos and FARC rebels agreed to end the five-decade-long armed conflict that killed more than 220,000 people ended the following month. 

Fernanda Forero and Andres Labrador hug in Plaza Bolivar during a political rally to end the Colombian conflict in Bogotá, Colombia. Overheard all around them, "que la guerra descansa en paz!" The war should rest in peace.

A doctor performs an abortion at a women’s reproductive health clinic on January 18, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Colombia has relatively liberal abortion laws compared to some of its South American neighbors - women can legally gets abortions when their health is in danger, the fetus is severely deformed or in cases of rape - but political opposition and bureaucratic hurdles make access difficult and drive women to dangerous illegal procedures. 

A pot of rice boils in La Guajira, Colombia. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights have ordered Colombia to take action against poverty in the region where more than 4,000 indigenous children have died of malnutrition in the past eight years.

Demonstrators are blocked by Police at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) while protesting U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. 

Babies nap at Fundación Juan Felipe Gómez Escobar, a non-profit organization that provides impovershed mothers healthcare, psychological therapy and job training in Cartagena, Colombia. 

Water is collected at a well in La Guajira, Colombia. In 2016 the region suffered the worst drought in history. 

Sofia Sanchez, 9, stands for a portrait during a vigil for her classmate and friend, Yuliana Samboni, 7, outside the home where she lived with her family in the Bosque Calderón neighborhood on December 6, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. Yuliana was taken from her home earlier this week by Rafael Uribe Noguera who raped, tortured and killed her. Her sign reads, "stop violence towards girls." 

Noel Castañeda poses for a portrait at Rafeal Trejo Boxing gym in Havana, Cuba. In 2005 Noel won the boxing world championships in London. Boxers at the gym are a mix women and men, many of which are like Noel who have moved to the city to learn from and with the best. 

Jose Rosado is one of 40 boaters taking people out to see wild flamingos at Camarones' sanctuary where he lives in La Guajira, Colombia. The boaters work in shifts because visitors don't come often. He said there's been a recent push to make his home a national park. If it happens it would remove him and everyone else who lives in the sanctuary.

Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto in the Amazon jungle of Colombia. He was born and raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots and wants to find ways to conserve the natural world, disseminate messages about respect. 

Maria Del Mar Toledo, 25, shows her scar from being shot while fighting for the FARC while in the one-bedroom apartment in Bogotá, Colombia on September 21, 2016. Toledo was 11 when she joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, known as FARC and demobilized after being shot at 17. She wishes the Colombian Peace Deal would include people like her. Toledo lives in Ciudad Bolivar, one of the most dangerous areas of Colombia's capital city of Bogotá. 

A goat is tied up in La Guajira, Colombia before it is skinned and cooked for a Wayuu burial ceremony. Wayuu people are the largest indigenous group in Colombia. 

Edwards Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. They live in neighboring towns along the Amazon River and see one another when Edwards can take a boat to visit. 

 

Yesenia Moreno Rodríguez, 25, poses for a portrait in Plaza Bolivar on November 11, 2016, in Bogotá, Colombia. She is part of Movimiento Estudiantil Paziempre, a student group dedicated to fighting for peace. After the Colombian peace deal was rejected, the group helped organize a silent march where 50,000 people ended up in Plaza Bolivar. 

Elivia Careca leads a song and dance activity to her pre-school class in Puerto Esperanza, Colombia. Elvia says it's important to teach children about to value the place where they are from. 

 

Thousands of people take part in a march for peace in downtown Bogotá on October 5, 2016, in Colombia. After Colombia's peace deal to end the armed conflict was rejected in a referendum, university students organized the event to demand that the government continues their efforts to achieve peace. 

Children play at Plaza Bolivar in Bogotá, Colombia. 

Nuria Serron, 84, was one of a town full of people who were dislocated in the Colombian Amazon due to the rising river. All but five community members moved from Pozo Redondo up the river to the unestablished town of Puerto Esperanza, which translates to Port of Hope. Nuria works as a medicine healer with her husband. They use homemade substances to heal their community. Nuria said many come to them before heading to the hospital.

Each year the Amazon River eroded more land where Ediver grew up. Eventually life for his family became unsustainable. At a young age he was dislocated and now lives in Puerto Esperanza, an hour from the where he was born.

A group of Wayuu people, indigenous to La Guajira in northern Colombia, leave a burial ceremony. Twenty-four-year-old Maricela Ipiayu was diagnosed with diabetes at 19 and later died of extreme malnutrution. 

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