Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto along the Amazon River in Colombia. Baru was born in Pozo Redondo, a village where most residents were dislocated due to rising river levels and land erosion. He moved up the river to a small town called Puerto Nariño before he could remember. 

Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto along the Amazon River in Colombia. Baru was born in Pozo Redondo, a village where most residents were dislocated due to rising river levels and land erosion. He moved up the river to a small town called Puerto Nariño before he could remember. 

 Elvia Careca acts as a water serpent while playing with her students, an activity she says teaches them to respect the power of the Amazon River. Elvia was born in Pozo Redondo and was moved to a village coined Puerto Esperanza at a young age. 

Elvia Careca acts as a water serpent while playing with her students, an activity she says teaches them to respect the power of the Amazon River. Elvia was born in Pozo Redondo and was moved to a village coined Puerto Esperanza at a young age. 

 Land along Pozo Redondo, which translates to "Round Port," is continually broken down and replenished by the Amazon River in Colombia. Most of the residents of Pozo Redondo were dislocated because of rising river levels and land erosion. Three families decided to stay. 

Land along Pozo Redondo, which translates to "Round Port," is continually broken down and replenished by the Amazon River in Colombia. Most of the residents of Pozo Redondo were dislocated because of rising river levels and land erosion. Three families decided to stay. 

 The Amazon River is central to those who live around it. The water is a bath for people's bodies and a way to clean clothing. It transports people from one village to another and its fish is a daily part of people's diet. 

The Amazon River is central to those who live around it. The water is a bath for people's bodies and a way to clean clothing. It transports people from one village to another and its fish is a daily part of people's diet. 

 Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

 Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

 Baru Ahue hugs a yuca plant on his first visit back to Pozo Redondo, a town he was dislocated from before he can remember. 

Baru Ahue hugs a yuca plant on his first visit back to Pozo Redondo, a town he was dislocated from before he can remember. 

 Baru Ahue shows photographs of his relatives to his Aunt, Nena Loriano Vento. Nena decided to remain on Pozo Redondo even though the majority of those who lived there decided to leave. Many found it too challenging to replant their crops every year when the river flooded their land. 

Baru Ahue shows photographs of his relatives to his Aunt, Nena Loriano Vento. Nena decided to remain on Pozo Redondo even though the majority of those who lived there decided to leave. Many found it too challenging to replant their crops every year when the river flooded their land. 

 Boats are the only way to travel for those that live in Pozo Redondo. It is the only way to bring store bought goods like rice and sugar that cannot be cultivated on land, and a boat is the only way to get the two young children that live there to school. 

Boats are the only way to travel for those that live in Pozo Redondo. It is the only way to bring store bought goods like rice and sugar that cannot be cultivated on land, and a boat is the only way to get the two young children that live there to school. 

 Francisco Peña Ague prepares to clear out the fauna from a cement structure used to house the electricity vault when Pozo Redondo was a town. His daughter, Nati Baleria Peña smiles with Francisco. 

Francisco Peña Ague prepares to clear out the fauna from a cement structure used to house the electricity vault when Pozo Redondo was a town. His daughter, Nati Baleria Peña smiles with Francisco. 

 A game of soccer is played in Puerto Esperanza, which directly translates as “Port Hope.” The village is located in the Amazonas department of Colombia — three hours travel by boat from Leticia, the main port in the Colombian Amazon. 

A game of soccer is played in Puerto Esperanza, which directly translates as “Port Hope.” The village is located in the Amazonas department of Colombia — three hours travel by boat from Leticia, the main port in the Colombian Amazon. 

 A path connects Puerto Esperanza to Puerto Nariño, the only town with a hospital  for miles around. 

A path connects Puerto Esperanza to Puerto Nariño, the only town with a hospital  for miles around. 

 Clothing hangs to dry in Puerto Esperanza, a small settlement deep in the Amazon rainforest. Many of the residents here were dislocated from Pozo Redondo, about an hour away by boat. 

Clothing hangs to dry in Puerto Esperanza, a small settlement deep in the Amazon rainforest. Many of the residents here were dislocated from Pozo Redondo, about an hour away by boat. 

 Many locals who live along the Amazon River believe that sea animals protect humans on land. If they do not respect their environment, it is possible for the animals to desert their post and move on to other areas, leaving the people without any protection.

Many locals who live along the Amazon River believe that sea animals protect humans on land. If they do not respect their environment, it is possible for the animals to desert their post and move on to other areas, leaving the people without any protection.

 Edwards Fabián López Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug on a visit to her village, Puerto Esperanza. They live in neighboring villages, but without a road that connects them they rely on boats to visit each other. 

Edwards Fabián López Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug on a visit to her village, Puerto Esperanza. They live in neighboring villages, but without a road that connects them they rely on boats to visit each other. 

 Baru Ahue prepares to wash his clothing in the Amazon River. He was born in Pozo Redondo, raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots. He wants to find ways to conserve the natural world and disseminate messages about respect.

Baru Ahue prepares to wash his clothing in the Amazon River. He was born in Pozo Redondo, raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots. He wants to find ways to conserve the natural world and disseminate messages about respect.

 Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto along the Amazon River in Colombia. Baru was born in Pozo Redondo, a village where most residents were dislocated due to rising river levels and land erosion. He moved up the river to a small town called Puerto Nariño before he could remember. 
 Elvia Careca acts as a water serpent while playing with her students, an activity she says teaches them to respect the power of the Amazon River. Elvia was born in Pozo Redondo and was moved to a village coined Puerto Esperanza at a young age. 
 Land along Pozo Redondo, which translates to "Round Port," is continually broken down and replenished by the Amazon River in Colombia. Most of the residents of Pozo Redondo were dislocated because of rising river levels and land erosion. Three families decided to stay. 
 The Amazon River is central to those who live around it. The water is a bath for people's bodies and a way to clean clothing. It transports people from one village to another and its fish is a daily part of people's diet. 
 Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 
 Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 
 Baru Ahue hugs a yuca plant on his first visit back to Pozo Redondo, a town he was dislocated from before he can remember. 
 Baru Ahue shows photographs of his relatives to his Aunt, Nena Loriano Vento. Nena decided to remain on Pozo Redondo even though the majority of those who lived there decided to leave. Many found it too challenging to replant their crops every year when the river flooded their land. 
 Boats are the only way to travel for those that live in Pozo Redondo. It is the only way to bring store bought goods like rice and sugar that cannot be cultivated on land, and a boat is the only way to get the two young children that live there to school. 
 Francisco Peña Ague prepares to clear out the fauna from a cement structure used to house the electricity vault when Pozo Redondo was a town. His daughter, Nati Baleria Peña smiles with Francisco. 
 A game of soccer is played in Puerto Esperanza, which directly translates as “Port Hope.” The village is located in the Amazonas department of Colombia — three hours travel by boat from Leticia, the main port in the Colombian Amazon. 
 A path connects Puerto Esperanza to Puerto Nariño, the only town with a hospital  for miles around. 
 Clothing hangs to dry in Puerto Esperanza, a small settlement deep in the Amazon rainforest. Many of the residents here were dislocated from Pozo Redondo, about an hour away by boat. 
 Many locals who live along the Amazon River believe that sea animals protect humans on land. If they do not respect their environment, it is possible for the animals to desert their post and move on to other areas, leaving the people without any protection.
 Edwards Fabián López Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug on a visit to her village, Puerto Esperanza. They live in neighboring villages, but without a road that connects them they rely on boats to visit each other. 
 Baru Ahue prepares to wash his clothing in the Amazon River. He was born in Pozo Redondo, raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots. He wants to find ways to conserve the natural world and disseminate messages about respect.

Baru Ahue bathes in Lake Tarapoto along the Amazon River in Colombia. Baru was born in Pozo Redondo, a village where most residents were dislocated due to rising river levels and land erosion. He moved up the river to a small town called Puerto Nariño before he could remember. 

Elvia Careca acts as a water serpent while playing with her students, an activity she says teaches them to respect the power of the Amazon River. Elvia was born in Pozo Redondo and was moved to a village coined Puerto Esperanza at a young age. 

Land along Pozo Redondo, which translates to "Round Port," is continually broken down and replenished by the Amazon River in Colombia. Most of the residents of Pozo Redondo were dislocated because of rising river levels and land erosion. Three families decided to stay. 

The Amazon River is central to those who live around it. The water is a bath for people's bodies and a way to clean clothing. It transports people from one village to another and its fish is a daily part of people's diet. 

Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

Casilda Ague Benites is one of six people that live on Pozo Redondo. Although the river rises each year and ruins her crop, she likes how rich the land becomes when the tide lowers. 

Baru Ahue hugs a yuca plant on his first visit back to Pozo Redondo, a town he was dislocated from before he can remember. 

Baru Ahue shows photographs of his relatives to his Aunt, Nena Loriano Vento. Nena decided to remain on Pozo Redondo even though the majority of those who lived there decided to leave. Many found it too challenging to replant their crops every year when the river flooded their land. 

Boats are the only way to travel for those that live in Pozo Redondo. It is the only way to bring store bought goods like rice and sugar that cannot be cultivated on land, and a boat is the only way to get the two young children that live there to school. 

Francisco Peña Ague prepares to clear out the fauna from a cement structure used to house the electricity vault when Pozo Redondo was a town. His daughter, Nati Baleria Peña smiles with Francisco. 

A game of soccer is played in Puerto Esperanza, which directly translates as “Port Hope.” The village is located in the Amazonas department of Colombia — three hours travel by boat from Leticia, the main port in the Colombian Amazon. 

A path connects Puerto Esperanza to Puerto Nariño, the only town with a hospital  for miles around. 

Clothing hangs to dry in Puerto Esperanza, a small settlement deep in the Amazon rainforest. Many of the residents here were dislocated from Pozo Redondo, about an hour away by boat. 

Many locals who live along the Amazon River believe that sea animals protect humans on land. If they do not respect their environment, it is possible for the animals to desert their post and move on to other areas, leaving the people without any protection.

Edwards Fabián López Noriega gives his girlfriend Tatiana Pérez a hug on a visit to her village, Puerto Esperanza. They live in neighboring villages, but without a road that connects them they rely on boats to visit each other. 

Baru Ahue prepares to wash his clothing in the Amazon River. He was born in Pozo Redondo, raised in Puerto Nariño and indigenous to the clan Paucara. He says he's in search of lost roots. He wants to find ways to conserve the natural world and disseminate messages about respect.

show thumbnails