Jacinto Tapia rows over to the fields where he grew coca until switching to bananas last year, on October 29, 2015. He lives in the farming town of Tierradentro in northern Colombia. 

Jacinto Tapia rows over to the fields where he grew coca until switching to bananas last year, on October 29, 2015. He lives in the farming town of Tierradentro in northern Colombia. 

 In Tierradentro a crop substitution program encourages former coca growers like Jacinto to grow bananas or cacao. The are is under a unilateral cease-fire but thick with paramilitary and FARC history. Everyone has been affected by the war.

In Tierradentro a crop substitution program encourages former coca growers like Jacinto to grow bananas or cacao. The are is under a unilateral cease-fire but thick with paramilitary and FARC history. Everyone has been affected by the war.

 Farmers say they are proud to grow food but are having trouble making ends meet. 

Farmers say they are proud to grow food but are having trouble making ends meet. 

 Former coca farms that are now cultivating bananas are seen along the San Jorge River near Tierradentro, Colombia. 

Former coca farms that are now cultivating bananas are seen along the San Jorge River near Tierradentro, Colombia. 

 Juan Martinez yanks leaves from a coca plant before cutting it from the ground in Tierradentro. Farmers in the area, switching to crops other than coca, say they feel safer.    

Juan Martinez yanks leaves from a coca plant before cutting it from the ground in Tierradentro. Farmers in the area, switching to crops other than coca, say they feel safer. 

 

 Jacinto Tapia's coca plants could be harvested every 40 days, almost year-round. When soldiers ripped out his coca plants last year he signed up for the crop substitution program. 

Jacinto Tapia's coca plants could be harvested every 40 days, almost year-round. When soldiers ripped out his coca plants last year he signed up for the crop substitution program. 

 Farmer Juan Martinez washes pesticides from his arms after manually eradicating coca plants on a banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. 

Farmer Juan Martinez washes pesticides from his arms after manually eradicating coca plants on a banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. 

 Jacinto Tapia secures a canoa after working on his banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. With financial assistance from USAID, Colombia Responde offers support to farmers in the area for the production and commercialization of banana and cacao crops as well as pisciculture. 

Jacinto Tapia secures a canoa after working on his banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. With financial assistance from USAID, Colombia Responde offers support to farmers in the area for the production and commercialization of banana and cacao crops as well as pisciculture. 

 Tierradentro is a farming town in the Cordoba department in northern Colombia. -- This project was originally commissioned for the Washington Post

Tierradentro is a farming town in the Cordoba department in northern Colombia. -- This project was originally commissioned for the Washington Post

 Jacinto Tapia rows over to the fields where he grew coca until switching to bananas last year, on October 29, 2015. He lives in the farming town of Tierradentro in northern Colombia. 
 In Tierradentro a crop substitution program encourages former coca growers like Jacinto to grow bananas or cacao. The are is under a unilateral cease-fire but thick with paramilitary and FARC history. Everyone has been affected by the war.
 Farmers say they are proud to grow food but are having trouble making ends meet. 
 Former coca farms that are now cultivating bananas are seen along the San Jorge River near Tierradentro, Colombia. 
 Juan Martinez yanks leaves from a coca plant before cutting it from the ground in Tierradentro. Farmers in the area, switching to crops other than coca, say they feel safer.    
 Jacinto Tapia's coca plants could be harvested every 40 days, almost year-round. When soldiers ripped out his coca plants last year he signed up for the crop substitution program. 
 Farmer Juan Martinez washes pesticides from his arms after manually eradicating coca plants on a banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. 
 Jacinto Tapia secures a canoa after working on his banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. With financial assistance from USAID, Colombia Responde offers support to farmers in the area for the production and commercialization of banana and cacao crops as well as pisciculture. 
 Tierradentro is a farming town in the Cordoba department in northern Colombia. -- This project was originally commissioned for the Washington Post

Jacinto Tapia rows over to the fields where he grew coca until switching to bananas last year, on October 29, 2015. He lives in the farming town of Tierradentro in northern Colombia. 

In Tierradentro a crop substitution program encourages former coca growers like Jacinto to grow bananas or cacao. The are is under a unilateral cease-fire but thick with paramilitary and FARC history. Everyone has been affected by the war.

Farmers say they are proud to grow food but are having trouble making ends meet. 

Former coca farms that are now cultivating bananas are seen along the San Jorge River near Tierradentro, Colombia. 

Juan Martinez yanks leaves from a coca plant before cutting it from the ground in Tierradentro. Farmers in the area, switching to crops other than coca, say they feel safer. 

 

Jacinto Tapia's coca plants could be harvested every 40 days, almost year-round. When soldiers ripped out his coca plants last year he signed up for the crop substitution program. 

Farmer Juan Martinez washes pesticides from his arms after manually eradicating coca plants on a banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. 

Jacinto Tapia secures a canoa after working on his banana farm in Tierradentro, Colombia on October 29, 2015. With financial assistance from USAID, Colombia Responde offers support to farmers in the area for the production and commercialization of banana and cacao crops as well as pisciculture. 

Tierradentro is a farming town in the Cordoba department in northern Colombia. -- This project was originally commissioned for the Washington Post

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